Tahr nannies and juvenile males

Image: Dylan Higgison | ©

Introduction

DOC is working with Ngāi Tahu and the Tahr Plan Implementation Liaison Group, to over time reduce the size of the tahr population back within the limits of the Himalayan Thar Control Plan 1993.

Tahr Control Operational Plan

Purpose of the plan

The management of Himalayan tahr is governed by a statutory plan, the Himalayan Thar Control Plan 1993, prepared under section 5(1)(d) of the Wild Animal Control Act 1977.

A key element of the Himalayan Thar Control Plan is that it sets a maximum population of 10,000 tahr across Crown pastoral leases, private and public conservation land in the tahr feral range (the legal boundary of where tahr are allowed to be).

1 July 2020 to 30 June 2021 plan

Tahr Control Operational Plan 2020/2021 (PDF, 1,847K) reconsidered after consultation

Update 14 September 2020

DOC has recently met with the Game Animal Council to discuss where Himalayan tahr control operations will be undertaken this year. The meeting follows the release of the reconsidered Tahr Control Operational Plan for 2020/21.

After a very positive meeting with the Council, DOC has now finalised where control will be undertaken this year. DOC sought the Council's advice on the allocation of the remaining 77 hours of planned control outside the national parks' management unit. The total number of control hours remain the same, however DOC has reallocated some of the remaining hours to less accessible areas of the feral range.

Summary of changes

DOC is reducing its previously planned control hours within the South Rakaia and Upper Rangitata management unit which is favoured by hunters. DOC has also completed control for the year in the Wills/Makarora/Hunter management unit where tahr numbers are at relatively low densities.

DOC is avoiding popular hunting spots and huts and is focusing on controlling high densities of tahr within terrain that is less suitable for ground hunting. For example, DOC is still regularly finding groups of up to 30 tahr in the Landsborough where access is challenging. DOC is reallocating some of the remaining control hours to target less accessible areas of the feral range.

DOC will continue to leave identifiable male tahr for hunters outside of the national parks’ management unit. Plans are also progressing to improve hunter access where possible, including extending the popular tahr ballot.

DOC will continue to update the DOC website with the latest control data and will make it clear once control within a management unit is complete for the year.

Use the tahr sightings maps to identify hot spots where identifiable males have been observed during control operations and left behind.

Tahr control for 2020/21 has been completed in the following areas:

  • Potts, Arrowsmith and Cloudy Peak ranges (Management Unit 1: South Rakaia – Upper Rangitata)
  • Southern Two Thumb Range and Sinclair Range (Management Unit 3: Gammack/Two Thumb)
  • Ahuriri and the Ben Ohau faces (Management Unit 5: Ben Ohau)
  • All of Management Unit 7: Wills/Hunter/Makarora
Changes to control hours within Himalayan tahr Management Units
Management Units (MU) Total planned hours within the Tahr Control Operational Plan for 2020/21 Approximate hours completed between July and August 2020 Approximate remaining hours to be completed
MU 1:
South Rakaia –
Upper Rangitata
25 12 4
MU 2:
South Whitcombe – Whataroa
25 12.5 23
MU 3: Gammack/Two Thumb 20 11 9
MU 5: Ben Ohau 10 5 9
MU 6: Landsborough 40 20 30
MU 7: Wills/ Makarora/Hunter 20 3.5 0

See the map of the Management Units (PDF, 1,158K).

Other control

As well as the 77 hours discussed with the Game Animal Council, DOC will undertake a further 55 hours in the national parks’ management unit.

DOC is also concerned about the geographical spread of tahr, which is why it is targeting the northern and southern points of the feral range. This will be complemented by 145 hours of planned control in the exclusion zones and outside the feral range.

Update 1 September 2020 

DOC has released its reconsidered Tahr Control Operational Plan for 1 July 2020 to 30 June 2021 (Operational Plan).

Documents related to the consultation process and decision are avaialble below, with a link to questions and answers.

Decision summary

In developing the reconsidered Operational Plan for 2020/2021, DOC took into account its legal obligations, materials it provided to stakeholders in advance of a meeting with them, and oral and written submissions from 14 stakeholders.

While DOC considered all stakeholders’ requests for changes to the annual Operational Plan, we acknowledge the finalised plan will not completely satisfy all stakeholders, as submitters sought very different outcomes.

New elements of the reconsidered Operational Plan include: 

  • A formal assurance DOC will avoid targeting tahr in popular recreational hunting areas located outside of the national park’s management unit.
  • DOC will explore options to improve opportunities for recreational hunting, guided hunting, and commercial recovery of tahr. This will include options to extend the tahr ballot, options to improve hunter access, the provision of maps with information on bull sightings and easy-to-access areas with high tahr numbers, as well as communication with hunting permit holders.
  • DOC is committed to learning as it goes. We will invite the Game Animal Council to a discussion on the results of 2020/21 control operations to date. DOC will consider the Council’s advice in determining the operational detail of work for the remaining control effort outside of the national parks’ management unit.
  • Urgently progressing plans to work with Ngāi Tahu, researchers and stakeholders to develop an integrated research and monitoring programme by 10 December. The implementation of this programme will begin over summer.
  • DOC’s discussion with the Game Animal Council will include whether to cease all further planned control in the Wills, Makarora and Hunter areas (Management Unit 7).

DOC’s reconsidered Tahr Control Operational Plan for 2020/2021 seeks to achieve the following key objectives:

  • Targeting all tahr in Aoraki/Mt Cook and Westland Tai Poutini National Parks to the lowest practicable densities to protect and preserve these special places.
  • Controlling high densities of female and juvenile tahr across the tahr feral range to reduce tahr impacts and population spread, while leaving smaller groups and identifiable males outside of the national parks for hunters.
  • Important control outside of the tahr feral range to stop the geographical range of tahr from expanding.
  • Working with Land Information New Zealand to understand tahr numbers on Crown pastoral leases.

DOC will achieve this by:

  • Undertaking up to 250 hours of control inside of the feral range. (DOC has already completed 118 hours since mid-July).
  • Considering the Game Animal Council’s advice in determining the operational detail of work for the remaining control effort outside the national parks’ management unit. Control work in the national parks will proceed while this occurs.
  • Targeting all tahr outside the feral range to stop the geographical range expanding.

Decision documents

We have released the decision document and all information Deputy Director-General Mike Slater considered before making his decision to approve the revised Tahr Control Operational Plan for 2020/21.

These documents outline the consultation process, submissions, analysis and how the Tahr Control Operational Plan was reconsidered.

Decision document: Reconsideration of the Tahr Control Operational Plan 2020/21 (PDF, 3,508K)

Tahr Control Operational Plan 2020/2021 (PDF, 1,847K) reconsidered after consultation

Documents related to the consultation process and decision:

Note: some of these documents are low quality scans

Control to date

Following a legal challenge on the previously approved Tahr Control Operational Plan for 2020/2021, a decision from the High Court allowed DOC to complete up to 125 hours of aerial tahr-control while consulting stakeholders on the plan.

We have completed 118 hours of control and have recently published maps showing the locations of more than 1000 observations of bull tahr that have been left for hunters. The area we have flown is less than 15% of 425,000ha of public conservation land located within the feral range, but outside the national parks’ management unit.

FAQs

We have provided an FAQ section to answer questions you may have about the Tahr Control Operational Plan for 2020/2021.

FAQ about the Tahr Control Operational Plan for 2020/2021

Supporting documents

Original Tahr Control Operational Plan 2020/21 (PDF, 2,119K) The plan was replaced 1 September 2020

Previous Tahr Control Operational Plans

Reports on the impacts of Himalayan tahr:

Population monitoring reports:


Find tahr hunting ‘hotspots’

DOC is mapping the locations of tahr observed on public conservation land.

Use tahr sightings maps to help plan your next hunt

Tahr Returns app

Use the app to record the number of Himalayan tahr you've hunted.

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